Gary Preservation Tour 2018 needs your support

Eric Allix Rogers Leave a comment

Gary Union Station [Eric Allix Rogers/Chicago Patterns]

Gary Union Station [Eric Allix Rogers/Chicago Patterns]

After a successful debut in 2017, the effort to crowdfund a 2018 Gary Preservation Tour has begun. Organizers intend to repeat open house-style access to a number of downtown Gary’s most notable buildings, while also expanding tours into two of the city’s distinctive residential neighborhoods, Horace Mann and Morningside.

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Preservation Chicago’s 2018 “Chicago 7” Most Endanged list released

Eric Allix Rogers Leave a comment
Jackson Park [Eric Allix Rogers/Chicago Patterns]

Jackson Park [Eric Allix Rogers/Chicago Patterns]

At noon on Wednesday, February 28, Preservation Chicago released its annual Chicago 7 list of most endangered buildings. Each year for the past 15 years, the local historic preservation advocacy organization has used this list to draw the public’s attention to threatened elements of Chicago’s built environment. Whether they face specific and urgent threats, or longer-term and more diffuse ones, failing to preserve these places would erase important parts of Chicago’s history and harm the distinctive and celebrated built environment of the city.

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The End of Marquette Photo Supply, One of Chicago’s Last Camera Shops

John Morris 2 comments

Marquette Photo Supply in 2015 [John Morris/Chicago Patterns]

On 63rd near Spaulding in the Chicago Lawn neighborhood, 73 years of photography history came to a close with passing of Joseph Herbert, aged 93. Herbert ran Marquette Photo Supply, a small camera shop that stayed in business as most others closed in the face of digital photography, online sales, and the emergence of cell phone photography.

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Wins and Losses for Chicago Preservation in 2017

Chicago Patterns Staff 1 comment

1436 W. Berwyn faced demo, but now owned by preservation-minded buyer [John Morris/Chicago Patterns]

2017 brought the usual bag of heartbreaking losses in Chicago’s housing and building stock, but there are several notable wins too. In our annual retrospective of historic preservation, many themes of years past continue: 19th-century Italianate homes and flats in hot neighborhoods are replaced with new construction, one-of-a-kind landmarks in or near the city center are lost in the name of progress, and demolition by neglect continues.

As the race to capitalize on this current real estate cycle continues, landmark status is often the only effective tool to preserve historically important structures. Preservation-minded real estate buyers also continue to affect real change in preservation efforts.

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