Viewing all posts from the Ukrainian Village neighborhood

A Woman’s Name Above the Door

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[John Morris/Chicago Patterns

Bernice
Corner of Augusta and Oakley, built 1917

[John Morris/Chicago Patterns]

Palmyra (with a Municipal Device on the cartouche)
2530-2532 Kedzie Boulevard, built 1902

[John Morris/Chicago Patterns]

Roxana
2500 N Kedzie Boulevard, early 1900s

[John Morris/Chicago Patterns]

Sylvia
1000-1002 N Oakley, built around 1915.


The Emergence, Demolition, and Preservation of Italianate Cottages and Flats

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2429 W Augusta (center) facing demolition [John Morris/Chicago Patterns]


As Northwest Side neighborhoods along the Blue Line experience glowing hot growth in real estate values, original homes and flats are getting erased in favor of expensive new construction. While this trend has long been an issue in older neighborhoods near the lake or the Loop, this rapid expansion of teardown construction in these neighborhoods is a more recent phenomenon.

In years past, as successive waves of people moved into these neighborhoods, existing housing stock was a source of pride and buildings were rehabbed and improved. The change in neighborhood demographics this time is different as wealthy newcomers often opt for large single-family homes often built after tearing down an existing home.

The loss of housing stock in these areas is particularly painful as the homes getting destroyed are well over a hundred years old, many of which were erected in the aftermath of the Great Fire.

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Day Into Night at Damen and Division

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The corner of Damen and Division is always buzzing with pedestrians, cyclists, and drivers. I set up a camera on a particularly colorful evening recently and recorded the transition from day into night, compressing it to about 60 seconds.

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Faded Ukrainian advertisement

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This is the only Ukrainian advert I found in Ukrainian village, but I hope to find more.

I asked a Ukrainian friend what the writing says, but the paint is too faded for a clear translation. It says something along the lines of “pay for [unintelligible] every quarter from the savings.”

Near St. Volodymyr Ukrainian Catholic church on North Oakley Boulevard.