The Value is in the Land: Lincoln Park Italianate Edition

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2145 N Fremont, released from Demolition Delay list over the summer [John Morris/Chicago Patterns]

Last month we looked at the history of Italianate cottages and flats in the near West/Northwest Side neighborhoods, and how they are getting torn down to make way for larger residences. While that story is relatively new for those neighborhoods, it’s almost a tradition in near North Side areas like Lincoln Park.

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Narrow Edges Along the Diagonal at 635 W. Belden

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[John Morris/Chicago Patterns]

At 635 W. Belden near the alley behind Lincoln, a particularly quirky residential building sits on a triangular lot.

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44th Annual Historic Pullman House Tour this Weekend

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S. St Lawrence near 112th [John Morris/Chicago Patterns]

Pullman, a recently minted a national monument and treasure, is opening up for the 44th annual house tour this weekend, from 11AM to 5PM.

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The Emergence, Demolition, and Preservation of Italianate Cottages and Flats

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2429 W Augusta (center) facing demolition [John Morris/Chicago Patterns]


As Northwest Side neighborhoods along the Blue Line experience glowing hot growth in real estate values, original homes and flats are getting erased in favor of expensive new construction. While this trend has long been an issue in older neighborhoods near the lake or the Loop, this rapid expansion of teardown construction in these neighborhoods is a more recent phenomenon.

In years past, as successive waves of people moved into these neighborhoods, existing housing stock was a source of pride and buildings were rehabbed and improved. The change in neighborhood demographics this time is different as wealthy newcomers often opt for large single-family homes often built after tearing down an existing home.

The loss of housing stock in these areas is particularly painful as the homes getting destroyed are well over a hundred years old, many of which were erected in the aftermath of the Great Fire.

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