Viewing all posts from the Lincoln Park neighborhood

Wins and Losses for Chicago Buildings in 2016

Chicago Patterns Staff 4 comments

Every year brings new buildings and the demolition of others–it’s the continuous cycle that transforms inanimate structures into the growing and evolving organism of a city. In times of wealth and prosperity the number of construction and demolition permits grow, and in times of recession they dwindle.

Last year this cycle repeated largely as it has in years past. But there were a few themes in the destruction of Chicago’s architectural heritage: late 19th century Worker’s Cottages, grand South Side homes, Italianate row houses, and a few sparkling Victorians on the North Side.

It wasn’t all losses in 2016–there were a few wins, particularly neglected or damaged churches that will live on through adaptive reuse.

 

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The Value is in the Land: 1953 N. Hudson

John Morris 1 comment

hudson [John Morris/Chicago Patterns]

hudson [John Morris/Chicago Patterns]

In our new series called The Value is in the Land, we’ll look at historic homes and buildings which face an uncertain future as a result of their high-value location.

The first entry is 1953 N. Hudson Avenue, in Lincoln Park (pictured above). This circa 1893 Italianate home sits on a street filled with garish jumbo houses recently built, with a few original homes remaining.

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The End of McGaw Hall

Rachel Freundt 2 comments

[Rachel Freundt/Chicago Patterns]

[Rachel Freundt/Chicago Patterns]

Last month DePaul University demolished McGaw Hall on their Lincoln Park campus for a new brick and glass building from Antunovich Associates that will house the university’s music school.

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Ferdinand Kaufmann Store & Flats

Rachel Freundt Leave a comment

[Rachel Freundt/Chicago Patterns]

[Rachel Freundt/Chicago Patterns]

One of the earliest surviving Adler & Sullivan-designed buildings was constructed for Ferdinand Kaufmann in two sections between 1883 and 1887 at 2312-14 N. Lincoln.

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